Happy Thanksgiving

I searched for some fun photos for this post because I want to begin my Thanksgiving celebration with a few good laughs. I need them, especially after enduring a few busy and somewhat stressful weeks of doing dull errands and rushing to finish outdoor chores before darkness covers my world at the early hour of 5:00 p.m. in the afternoon.

I hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving!  I would also like to take a moment to send positive healing wishes to my fellow WordPress bloggers who are sick or facing other difficult circumstances this year. Take care of yourselves, and I hope things will get better. :)

 

Thanksgiving Signs

Lusty Lady marquee.jpg

Photo was taken by Flickr user Susyblue, from http://flickr.com/photos/susyblue/66669452/ . Published under CC-BY-SA.

Lusty Lady "Happy Spanksgiving" marquee

Marquee of the Lusty Lady, a peep show in downtown Seattle, Thanksgiving 2005.

 

Thanksgiving Gator on a Stick.jpg

By Lis Rock (originally posted to Flickr as 154-5423_IMG) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

French Market, New Orleans

French Market, New Orleans
27 November 2004, 11:48:50
Source: originally posted to Flickr as 154-5423_IMG

 

Turkey Balloons

Turkey Balloon Animal.jpg

By Sean McMenemy (Flickr: _MG_3049) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

A turkey balloon animal from the 2nd Annual Liberty Giving Thanks

A turkey balloon animal from the 2nd Annual Liberty Giving Thanks
24 November 2011, 10:13:25
Source: Flickr:_MG_3049

 

Macys-parade-1979.jpg

By Jon Harder (User JonHarder) [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC-BY-2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

Macy's parade turkey parade float and Underdog parade float

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on Broadway in the upper 40s, 1979. Bob Keeshan rides the Tom Turkey float as the Underdog balloon follows.
November 1979

 

Thanksgiving Food

Does this look appetizing to you?

Flambéed sweet potato pie.jpg

By Edsel Little (Next Childhood-45) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Flambéed sweet potato pie

Flambéed sweet potato pie
6 January 2012, 21:43
Source: Next Childhood-45

 

These look too cute to eat.

Turkey cake pops (6428214767).jpg

By Jamie from Birmingham, AL, USA (Turkey Cake Pops) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Turkey Cake Pops

Turkey Cake Pops
22 November 2011, 08:46
Source: Turkey Cake Pops

 

Turkey Trots

Wikipedia describes a turkey trot as a “fun run or footrace, usually of the long-distance variety, that is held on or around Thanksgiving Day in the United States.” It further notes that “[m]ost turkey trots benefit local charities.”

Source: “Turkey Trot” – Wikipedia

 

111127-A-HN782-207.jpg

By U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Brandon Pomrenke [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

U.S. Army Spc. Alexander Raborn runs in a turkey trot race

U.S. Army Spc. Alexander Raborn, the designated turkey for the Kabul Satellite Turkey Chase 10K run, takes part in the event Nov. 27, 2011, at Headquarters International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) Joint Command in Kabul, Afghanistan. Raborn was selected to be “chased” by a variety of coalition runners from ISAF’s contributing nations. More than 100 runners showed up for the event despite gusty winds and rain-soaked roads. The race was a satellite version of the main Turkey Chase held Thanksgiving Day in Bethesda, Md.
27 November 2011, 08:30:22
Source: http://www.defenseimagery.mil/imagery.html#a=search&s=thanksgiving&n=90&t=0&guid=9277accb5c0b08a5c253564de36c00044fc37067

 

PostcardCueroTXTurkeyTrot1912.jpg

By “A. A. Brack, S. A. Texas” (“S. A.” = San Antonio?). [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 Postcard of a "Turkey Trot" in Cuero on November, 26, 1912 (about Thanksgiving Day in the United States)

Postcard of a “Turkey Trot” in Cuero on November, 26, 1912 (about Thanksgiving Day in the United States)
26 September 1912

 

 

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November Skies

I hope you enjoy these beautiful autumn sky pictures. All of these photos were taken in the month of November but only two of them were taken in the same year.

I cannot believe how fast the time is passing by.  It will be winter soon!

 

Sky (11239043295).jpg

By Robert Basic from Germany (sky Uploaded by AVIA BavARia) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

sky

sky
21 November 2013, 01:24
Source: sky

 

Plage de Faro (288327105).jpg

By Guy MOLL from Faro, Portugal (plage de Faro Uploaded by tm) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

photo of a beach and dark clouds

plage de Faro
3 November 2006, 11:40
Source: plage de Faro

 

Phoenix on the sky.jpg

By FrankPan (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

sunset photo

sunset at south west marine drive
29 November 2011

 

Starling shapes in the evening sky – geograph.org.uk – 1065181.jpg

Walter Baxter [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

starling birds flying together at sunset

Starling shapes in the evening sky A large number of starlings congregate at Gretna every evening at sunset during the winter months to perform an elaborate aerobatic display before roosting in nearby conifer plantations. It can be quite breathtaking to witness the birds twisting into unusual patterns in the sky.
29 November 2008
Source: From geograph.org.uk

 

Warrenpoint red sky.jpg

By Ryan Mcdonald from ireland (Warrenpoint red sky) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Carlinford Lough early morning

Carlinford Lough early morning
27 November 2007, 08:38
Source: Warrenpoint red sky

 

Quiver trees in Namibia waiting for a new day.jpg

By waterwin (Quiver trees in Namibia waiting for a new day) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

quiver trees before sunrise

After taking pictures of the night sky, the coming of a new day gives a band of light in the Quiver Tree Forest near Keetmanshoop
10 November 2008, 04:53
Source: Quiver trees in Namibia waiting for a new day

 

Fullmoon at Great Falls (Virginia).jpg

By Rob Shenk from Great Falls, VA, USA (Full Moon at Great Falls Uploaded by Gary Dee) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

full moon over the waterfalls on the Potomac River

View of an early evening full moon rising over the Great Falls on the Potomac River in Great Falls, Virginia
20 November 2010, 04:59
Source: Full Moon at Great Falls

 

Lune – Réunion.jpg

By tirados joselito from Aix-en-Provence, France. (Flickr.) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The moon reflecting off the ocean in La Reunion.

La lune se reflétant sur l’océan à La Réunion.
English translation: The moon reflecting off the ocean in La Reunion.
26 November 2004, 04:06
Source: Flickr

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Tree Oddities

I am impressed by the lengths trees will go to in order to survive. They will bend their limbs and roots so that they will fit in small out-of-the-way spaces. They will push their way through rocks and bricks and sometimes grow into them. They will defy wind and gravity even if it means being twisted into the bizarre shapes you will see in this week’s post.

 

Deformed tree in Goodland’s Gardens – geograph.org.uk – 1277485.jpg

Nick Chipchase [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Deformed tree in Goodland's Gardens Originally the tree had grown into a wall.

Deformed tree in Goodland’s Gardens Originally the tree had grown into a wall.
28 April 2009
Source: From geograph.org.uk

 

Hacienda Cocoyoc 2003-005.JPG

By Siechfred (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Tree root growing over an old stone arc (Hacienda Cocoyoc, Oaxtepec, Mexico)

Tree root growing over an old stone arc (Hacienda Cocoyoc, Oaxtepec, Mexico)
1 May 2003

 

Unusual Birch – geograph.org.uk – 411181.jpg

Dave Fergusson [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Unusual Birch Growing from a seam in the rock in Fascadale Wood.

Unusual Birch Growing from a seam in the rock in Fascadale Wood.
22 April 2007
Source: From geograph.org.uk

 

Hakenschlagende Birke.jpg

By Angela Marie (Flickr: 090207_0345) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

 A "hook-beating" birch

Eine „hakenschlagende“ Birke (Betula sp.)
English translation: A “hook-beating” birch (Betula sp.)
1 July 2010, 09:22
Source: Flickr: 090207_0345

 

Limber Pine along the Sky High Trail.jpg

By Mitch Barrie from Costa Mesa, CA, USA (Limber Pine along the Sky High Trail) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

    Limber Pine along the Sky High Trail, San Gorgonio Wilderness, San Bernardino Mountains, California.

Limber Pine along the Sky High Trail, San Gorgonio Wilderness, San Bernardino Mountains, California.
4 September 2011, 13:42
Source: Limber Pine along the Sky High Trail

 

Tree With Unusual Twisted Branches – geograph.org.uk – 1311558.jpg

Ann Harrison [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

tree with unusual twisted branches

Tree With Unusual Twisted Branches This tree is in a small park not far from the south end of the town centre.
11 May 2009
Source: From geograph.org.uk

 

Frösakull-tallar.jpg

By Thomas Dahr [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Pinus sylvestris, deformed by wind.

Pinus sylvestris, deformed by wind. Approx. 60 years old, planted on sandy land close by the coast of Halland, Sweden.
Source: Photo by Thomas Dahr, 1979, at Frösakull. Kodakchrome diapositiv.

 

Hintersee Zauberwald 07.JPG

By Geolina163 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Berchtesgaden: Geotop Magic Forest Hintersee: Tree roots in rock boulders of the landslide

Berchtesgaden: Geotop Zauberwald am Hintersee: Baumwurzeln an Felsgeröllen des Bergsturzes
English translation: Berchtesgaden: Geotop Magic Forest Hintersee: Tree roots in rock boulders of the landslide
25 October 2006, 06:15:22

 

Kodaik.JPG

By Googlesuresh (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

photo of tree roots on hillside

1 January 2009

 

Unusual root system seen from the footpath to Clicket – geograph.org.uk – 688600.jpg

Ian Wigley [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Unusual root system seen from the footpath to Clicket Part of a neglected "bank and hedge" field boundary, left to nature.

Unusual root system seen from the footpath to Clicket Part of a neglected “bank and hedge” field boundary, left to nature.
10 February 2008
Source: From geograph.org.uk

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Zoomorphic Pareidolia

Many people have seen faces or strange shapes in clouds or other objects. This psychological phenomenon is called pareidolia. According to Wikipedia, pareidolia “involv[es] a vague and random stimulus (often an image or sound) being perceived as significant.” It “is a type of apophenia, seeing patterns in random data.”

This week’s post features rocks that most of us will perceive as animals, a phenomenon known as zoomorphic pareidolia. These rocks are found throughout the world in a variety of settings, including arid regions and rocky coasts.

Source: “Pareidolia” – Wikipedia

Bear Rocks

Capo dorso.JPG

By Tobias Helfrich (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

photo of Capo d'Orso rock formation

Bär des Capo d’Orso
created 25. Sep. 2005

 

Tourists at Capo d’Orso, Palau, Sardinia, Italy.jpg

Marek Slusarczyk [CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Tourists at Capo d'Orso rock, Palau, Sardinia, Italy.

Tourists at Capo d’Orso rock, Palau, Sardinia, Italy.
17 July 2005

 

Bear Rocks.jpg

By Arkoudes (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

the Bear Rocks off the coast of Milos

The Bear Rocks off the coast of Milos taken by my own camera on a boat.
[Editor’s Note: Milos Island is located in Greece.]

 

Bear.rock.JPG

By Vihou World (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Arkoudes (The Bear Rock) off the shore of Milos Island.

Arkoudes (The Bear Rock) off the shore of Milos Island.
22 August 2014

 

Camel Rocks

Yehliu – Camel Rock.jpg

By Bernard Gagnon (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Camel's head rock in Yehliu Geopark, on the north coast of Taiwan

Camel’s head rock in Yehliu Geopark, on the north coast of Taiwan
13 March 2011

 

Tineida02CamelRock.jpg

Roland Unger [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Camel rock south of Tineida, el-Dakhla depression, Libyan Desert, Egypt

Camel rock south of Tineida, el-Dakhla depression, Libyan Desert, Egypt
17 February 2002

 

WhiteDesertCamel.jpg

Roland Unger [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Camel rock in the White desert, Qasr el-Dakhla, Western desert, Egypt

Camel rock in the White desert, Qasr el-Dakhla, Western desert, Egypt
6 March 2011

 

Elephant Rocks

Elephant Rock.JPG

By Cesco77 Francesco Canu (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Elephant Rock in Castelsardo, Sardinia, Italy

Elephant Rock in Castelsardo, Sardinia, Italy. This natural sculpture made by wind and rain has a Domus de janas [a type of prehistoric chamber tomb] inside of it.
22 May 2009

 

Elephant Rock – Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA.jpg

By InSapphoWeTrust from Los Angeles, California, USA (Valley of Fire State Park) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

 

photo of Elephant Rock in the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada

One of the crown jewels of Nevada State Parks system, Valley of Fire is a nice day trip from Las Vegas, and offers many hiking opportunities.
This is Elephant Rock, located at the eastern entrance of the park. The leftmost “pillar” does look like an elephant nose.
31 December 2011, 14:21
Source: Valley of Fire State Park

 

The elephant rock near Prilep (1).JPG

By ГП (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

The elephant rock near Prilep, Republic of Macedonia

The elephant rock near Prilep, Republic of Macedonia
12 May 2012

 

Elephnat Illizi Algeria.jpg

By Gruban / Patrick Gruban from Munich, Germany (Flickr) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Saltwork formation in the shape of elephant - location: Sahara, Illizi, Algeria

Saltwork formation in the shape of elephant (Sahara ; Illizi, Algeria)
April 15, 2006
Source: Flickr

 

On an unrelated note, this is my 100th post! :)

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After a Halloween Rain

It rained here in Sacramento on Halloween night. The storm was gone by morning, and the sun came out the next day. The morning light was so beautiful that I decided to take a few pictures of the water-soaked world around me.

 

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Phantoms

imaginenewdesigns12:

Happy Halloween!

Originally posted on Moonlight Gallery:

phantoms

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Decorated with the Dead

It is a grim problem. A church has only so many burial spaces on its grounds. What is to be done if the demand for burial spaces exceeds capacity? Over the centuries, macabre solutions emerged, and a few of them appear in this week’s Halloween post.

Sedlec Ossuary

The Sedlec Ossuary is located in the Czech Republic. According to the Sedlec Ossuary website, it “is artistically decorated by more than 40,000 human skeletons.”

How did the Sedlec Ossuary end up being decorated this way? It is a tale that began way back in 1278. After an abbot of the Sedlec Cistercian Monastery returned from Jerusalem with a jar of earth from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Sedlec cemetery became a popular place to be buried. People wanted their remains to mingle with the “‘Holy Soil’” that the abbot spread over the cemetery. The cemetery filled up quickly, especially after the Black Death swept through Europe, and expansion of the cemetery became a necessity. A Gothic church was built near the cemetery in the 15th century, and the basement of the church served as an ossuary (a place to store the bones of dead people) for several centuries.

Over the years, two decorators were assigned to the task of arranging the bones in the Sedlec Ossuary. The Sedlec website notes that this task was initially given to a “half blind monk who arranged the bones.” Three hundred years later in 1870, a local woodcarver named Frantisek Rindt picked up where the monk left off and took bone arranging in a whole new artistic direction. His work is what people see today when they visit the Sedlec Ossuary, which is also called the Church of Bones or the Bone Church.

Sources:

“Sedlec Ossuary: The Church of Bones” – sedlecossuary.com

“Sedlec Ossuary History: Historical Facts” – sedlecossuary.com

 

Sedlec Ossuary Entrance.jpg

By Strider gts (talk)Tyler Nofziger via Wikimedia Commons
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

entrance to the Sedlec Ossuary

Sedlec Ossuary
This is the entrance to the Sedlec Ossuary.
April 19th, 2006

 

Schwarzenberg coat-of-arms.jpg

Photo by en:User:Polyparadigm, released into public domain. Wikimedia Commons

Schwarzenberg coat-of-arms in the Sedlec Ossuary

Schwarzenberg coat-of-arms, executed by František Rint in 1870 for the Sedlec Ossuary.
21:06, 29 October 2005

 

Skeletal Arrangements, Sedlec Ossuary (6282849715).jpg

By Antony Stanley from Gloucester, UK [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

lamp and wall decorations made of human bones at the Sedlec Ossuary

Skeletal Arrangements #1, Sedlec Ossuary
23 October 2011, 11:29
Source: Skeletal Arrangements #1, Sedlec Ossuary

 

Kostnice Sedlec.JPG

By Pudelek (Marcin Szala) (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons

bone chandelier at Sedlec Ossuary, Kutná Hora

Sedlec Ossuary, Kutná Hora
December 2008

 

Bone Chandelabra.jpg

Photographer: Daniel Wabyick from San Francisco via Wikimedia Commons
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

Bone Chandelabra in Kutna Hora Ossuary. Czech republic

Bone Chandelabra
Bone Chandelabra in Kutna Hora Ossuary. Czech republic
2004-09-30 12:52:06
Source: Flickr.com – image description page

 

Sedlec Ossuary – Interior 9.JPG

By Interfase (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sedlec Ossuary - Interior

Sedlec Ossuary – Interior
This is a photo of a cultural monument of the Czech Republic,
number: 30874/2-1082
14 August 2014, 15:00:22

 

Sedlec Ossuary signature.jpg

Photo by en:User:Polyparadigm, released into public domain. Wikimedia Commons

Signature of the woodcarver who was charged with arranging the bones of the Sedlec Ossuary (František Rint from Česká Skalice).

Signature of the woodcarver who was charged with arranging the bones of the Sedlec Ossuary (František Rint from Česká Skalice).

 

Skull Chapel, Czermna

Located in southwestern Poland, Skull Chapel also has an interior decorated with human bones. Smithsonian reporter Perrin Doniger outlines some impressive statistics about how many bones cover its walls and ceiling and fill its crypt:

The skulls and leg bones of over 3,000 victims of wars and plagues cover the walls and ceiling, and a crypt below, accessible through a trapdoor, houses over 21,000 additional remains. Between 1776 and 1804, the local priest, Vaclav Tomasek, painstakingly gathered, cleaned and carefully arranged skeletons recovered from numerous, shallow mass graves left by the Thirty Years’ War, Silesian Wars and cholera outbreaks.

Source: “This Creepily Beautiful Chapel in Czermna, Poland, Is Constructed Out of Thousands of Human Bones” by Perrin Doniger – Smithsonian.com

Doniger further notes that Father Tomasek reserved the altar of Skull Chapel for “the bones of important figures and curiosities, including the skull of the local mayor, skulls with bullet holes, a skull deformed by syphilis and the bones of a supposed giant.” After he died in 1804, Father Tomasek’s skull “was placed on the altar as well.”

Although Skull Chapel is eerie, one can appreciate the amount of effort Father Tomasek put into decorating this church. He had only two assistants to help him with this task. According to Wikipedia, he worked with someone named J. Schmidt as well as a grave digger named J. Langer. In addition, Wikipedia notes that Father Tomasek’s artistic inspiration for Skull Chapel was “the Capuchin cemetery” (also known as the Capuchin Crypt), which we will visit next.

Sources:

“Skull Chapel, Czermna” – Wikipedia

“This Creepily Beautiful Chapel in Czermna, Poland, Is Constructed Out of Thousands of Human Bones” by Perrin Doniger – Smithsonian.com

 

Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – interior 02.jpg

By Merlin (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Interior of the Skulls Chapel in Czermna, Poland.

Interior of the Skulls Chapel in Czermna, Poland.
16 August 2009

 

Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – altar with skulls 03.jpg

By Merlin (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Poland - Czermna - Chapel of Skulls - altar with skulls

Chapel of Skulls in Czermna, Poland. Kaplica Czaszek w Czermnej. Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – altar with skulls
16 August 2009

 

File:Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – interior 07.jpg

By Merlin (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

angel wall decoration surrounded by bones at the Chapel of Skulls in Czermna, Poland

Chapel of Skulls in Czermna, Poland. Kaplica Czaszek w Czermnej. interior
16 August 2009

 

Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – ceiling.jpg

By Merlin (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Poland - Czermna - Chapel of Skulls - ceiling

Chapel of Skulls in Czermna, Poland. Kaplica Czaszek w Czermnej. Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – ceiling
16 August 2009

 

Poland – Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – cellar with skulls 01.jpg

By Merlin (Own work) [GFDL or CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Poland - Czermna - Chapel of Skulls - cellar with skulls

Chapel of Skulls in Czermna, Poland. Kaplica Czaszek w Czermnej. Poland -Czermna – Chapel of Skulls – cellar with skulls
16 August 2009

 

Capuchin Crypt

According to Wikipedia, the Capuchin Crypt is located underneath the church of Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini on the Via Veneto near Piazza Barberini in Rome, Italy. The Capuchin Crypt is the final resting place for the remains of approximately 3700 people. It is believed that these people were Capuchin friars, but no one knows for sure if all of them were friars. Having a smaller amount of human remains does not mean that the Capuchin Crypt is less eerie than the Sedlec Ossuary and Skull Chapel. In fact, the Capuchin Crypt makes up for its low body count with an orderly but creepy body management system. Wikipedia summarizes this system in its brief description of the construction of the crypt:

When the monks arrived at the church in 1631, moving from the old monastery, they brought 300 cartloads of deceased friars. Fr. Michael of Bergamo oversaw the arrangement of the bones in the burial crypt. The soil in the crypt was brought from Jerusalem, by order of Pope Urban VIII.

As monks died during the lifetime of the crypt, the longest-buried monk was exhumed to make room for the newly deceased who was buried without a coffin, and the newly reclaimed bones were added to the decorative motifs. Bodies typically spent 30 years decomposing in the soil, before being exhumed.

Source: “Capuchin Crypt” – Wikipedia

The bones, which are remains “believed to have been taken from the bodies of friars who had died between 1528 and 1870,” were then nailed, piled together, or hung in one of five rooms within the Capuchin Crypt:

  1. The Crypt of the Resurrection
  2. Crypt of the Skulls
  3. Crypt of the Pelvises
  4. Crypt of the Leg Bones and Thigh Bones
  5. Crypt of the Three Skeletons

There is a sixth room in the Capuchin Crypt called The Mass Chapel, but this room is used to celebrate Mass and does not contain any bones.

Capuchinos 2.jpg

By Tessier via Wikimedia Commons
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

remains of a deceased friar and bone wall art at the Capuchin Crypt

cripta Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini

 

Capuchinos 3.jpg

By Tessier via Wikimedia Commons
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

remains of four robed friars, bone wall art, and crosses at the Capuchin Crypt

Cripta de Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini, Roma

 

Cripta Cappuccini.jpg

By Tessier via Wikimedia Commons
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

the remains of three robed friars and bone wall art at the Capuchin Crypt

Cripta di Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini

 

Rom, Santa Maria Immacolata a Via Veneto, Krypta der Kapuziner 1.jpg

By Dnalor 01 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

two disembodied arms and bone wall art at the Capuchin Crypt

Cripta di Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini
12 April 2003, 16:36:17

 

Rom, Santa Maria Immacolata a Via Veneto, Krypta der Kapuziner 2.jpg

By Dnalor 01 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

two robed deceased friars, three skeletons, and bone wall art at the Capuchin Crypt

Cripta di Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini
12 April 2003, 16:36:56

 

Wikipedia notes that the “Catholic order insists that the display is not meant to be macabre, but a silent reminder of the swift passage of life on Earth and our own mortality.” I have not been to the Capuchin Crypt myself, but I can imagine how unsettling it would probably be to be surrounded by walls of human bones and mummified friars and then read the following placard in the Crypt of the Three Skeletons:

“What you are now we used to be; what we are now you will be…”

 

Source: “Capuchin Crypt” – Wikipedia

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