Replicas of Famous Landmarks

The lure of famous landmarks is irresistible. When I drove across the Golden Gate Bridge, I saw a large number of tourists with cameras in the rest area beside it. It did not seem to matter to them that haze partially obscured the view of the bridge. They were at one of the most famous bridges in the world!

That enthusiasm for experiencing something well-known and popular exists for other famous landmarks as well. For some people, however, visiting famous landmarks is not enough. They go one step further and build copies of them in their own towns. However, not all of these replicas of famous landmarks are exact duplicates. What I like about the replicas featured in this week’s post is that their creators added their own special twist to them, spicing up what would otherwise be dull viewing.

Eiffel Tower Replica – Paris, Texas

Texas Twisted notes that this Eiffel Tower replica was “erected by the Boiler Makers Local #902 in 1995.” With a height of 65 feet, it “was once billed as the ‘Second Largest Eiffel Tower in the Second Largest Paris.’” It lost this title a few years later when Tennessee relocated its 60-foot Eiffel Tower replica from Memphis to Paris, Tennessee, and builders added 10 feet to the Tennessee tower. (Tennessee eventually lost the title to Las Vegas when Las Vegas built a 540-foot replica of the Eiffel Tower along the Strip in 1999.)

Sources:

“Eiffel Tower With Big Cowboy Hat” – RoadsideAmerica.com

“The Eiffel Tower Paris, Texas” – Texas Twisted

Accepting defeat, the people of Paris, Texas, turned their energies elsewhere. Here is what they did according to Weird U.S.:

Rather than enter into an elevation race, the people of Lamar County decided instead to redeem themselves by making their landmark distinctly Texan. In 1998, a giant, red cowboy hat was bolted to the top of the tower. It was a blatant gimmick that many locals considered tres stupide, but it has certainly set Paris, Texas, apart from the others in a way that isn’t likely to be duplicated. Besides, it makes for a better postcard.

Source: “The Eiffel Tower of Paris, Texas” – Weird U.S.

Anyjazz65 – Paris, Texas – Eiffel tower replica.jpg

By anyjazz65 [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Replica of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas
Replica of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Texas
2 May 2008
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49024304@N00/2470601639

Eiffel Tower Replica Paris Texas DSC 0602 ad.JPG

By Adavyd (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Eiffel Tower Replica, Paris (Texas, USA)
Eiffel Tower Replica, Paris (Texas, USA)
14 October 2012, 12:13:20

Statue of Liberty Replicas

According to Wikipedia, “hundreds of smaller replicas of the Statue of Liberty have been created worldwide.” They can be found in a variety of settings such as parks, hotels, and building rooftops. The following replicas are from the United States. Some of these replicas stood out for me because of the use of unconventional color, style, and materials, while others presented an unusually fragmented view of Lady Liberty.

Source: “Replicas of the Statue of Liberty” – Wikipedia

New York Yankees Statue of Liberty 1.jpg

By Marianne O’Leary (originally posted to Flickr as New York Yankees) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

New York Yankees Statue of Liberty, part of a promotion for the 2008 MLB All-Star Game.
New York Yankees Statue of Liberty, part of a promotion for the 2008 MLB All-Star Game.
2 July 2008, 06:13:35
Source: originally posted to Flickr as New York Yankees

New York Yankees Statue of Liberty 2.jpg

By Chris (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_1091) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

New York Yankees Statue of Liberty #2, promotion for the 2008 MLB All-Star Game.
New York Yankees Statue of Liberty #2, promotion for the 2008 MLB All-Star Game.
12 July 2008, 15:11:05
Source: originally posted to Flickr as IMG_1091

Statue of Liberty made with LEGO.jpg

By Banfield (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5-ar], via Wikimedia Commons

Liberty Statue made with LEGO
Liberty Statue made with LEGO.
4 July 2012

Additional categories of this photo:

Can you imagine being an unsuspecting bystander at the University of Wisconsin- Madison during the winter of 1979? I’m pretty sure seeing the Statue of Liberty sticking up from the iced-over Lake Mendota, Planet-of-the-Apes-style, would probably stop you dead in your tracks. It started as a joke: two students promised that if they were elected to student government, they would get the Statue of Liberty relocated to campus. And they held true to their word, but sadly, the helicopters bringing her in floundered just as they entered campus and dropped our dear Liberty into the lake. Whoops. The poor thing was set ablaze just a few days later, but she returned in a fireproof format the next year. She was relegated to a storage silo for the next 19 years or so, but just this winter the students dragged her out to the frozen lake again just for kicks. (Note: This article was written in 2009.)

Source: “The Quick 10: Statues of Liberty (other than the original)” by Stacy Conradt – mentalfloss.com

Face of Statue of Liberty 2.jpg

By Nightscream at en.wikipedia [CC-BY-SA-2.5], from Wikimedia Commons

Same-size replica of the face of the Statue of Liberty
Same-size replica of the face of the Statue of Liberty, seen as part of the exhibit in one of the corridors of the Statue’s pedestal. Taken en:September 18, en:2006 by Nightscream.
2006-12-07 (original upload date)

Stonehenge Replicas

Copycat versions of Stonehenge have appeared (and disappeared) over the years. What would the builders of the original Stonehenge think of these replicas?

Pottyhenge

Banksyglasto.JPG

By Rodw at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

"Stonehenge" made of portable toilets, made by Banksy at the Glastonbury Festival June 2007
“Stonehenge” made of portable toilets, made by Banksy at the Glastonbury Festival June 2007. Taken by Rod Ward 22nd June 2007.

In case you do not know who Banksy is, here is a description from Wikipedia:

Banksy is a pseudonymous United Kingdom-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter.

His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stencilling technique. Such artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.

Source: “Banksy” – Wikipedia

Carhenge

Carhenge takes car art to a new level. Here is a description of it from carhenge.com:

Carhenge, which replicates Stonehenge, consists of the circle of cars, 3 standing trilithons within the circle, the heel stone, slaughter stone, and 2 station stones and includes a “Car Art Preserve” with sculptures made from cars and parts of cars.

Located just north of Alliance, Nebraska, Carhenge is formed from vintage American automobiles, painted gray to replicate Stonehenge. Built by Jim Reinders as a memorial to his father, it was dedicated at the June 1987 summer solstice. – See more at: http://carhenge.com/#sthash.hP8EZlXo.dpuf

Source: Home page – carhenge.com

Carhenge, Nebraska.JPG

By Nobi-nobita (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Full view of Carhenge
Full view of Carhenge
1 September 2012, 22:16:48

Carhenge from SW 2.JPG

By Ammodramus (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Carhenge, located near Alliance, Nebraska
Carhenge, located near Alliance, Nebraska; seen from the southwest.
20 September 2013, 18:58:23

Carhenge, inner circle.JPG

By Nobi-nobita (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Detail view of the inner circle of Carhenge
Detail view of the inner circle of Carhenge
1 September 2012, 22:06:57

Carhenge trivehiclon 1.JPG

By Ammodramus (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Carhenge, located near Alliance, Nebraska "trilithon" on western side
Carhenge, located near Alliance, Nebraska: “trilithon” on western side.
20 September 2013, 19:00:09

Foamhenge

In 2004, fiberglass sculptor Mark Cline of Enchanted Castle Studio created Foamhenge in Natural Bridge, Virginia. It is made completely out of foam. Cline paid careful attention to details so that Foamhenge would be an exact replica of the original Stonehenge. According to RoadsideAmerica.com, he “even consulted a local ‘psychic detective’ named Tom who has advised him on how to position Foamhenge so that it is astronomically correct.” When questioned about the durability of Foamhenge against the elements, Cline stated that “’it’s non-biodegradable so it might last longer than the original.’” As for the possibility of vandals ruining Foamhenge, Cline gave the following response:

“At some point we’ll cover it with stucco,” he says. “Until then I’m only five minutes down the road with a paintbrush and sandpaper. I’m here to baby sit it.”

Source: “Foamhenge” – RoadsideAmerica.com

Foamhenge (Natural Bridge).jpg

Photo by Ben Schumin via Wikimedia Commons

Detail of Foamhenge, a sculpture in Natural Bridge, Virginia
Detail of Foamhenge, a sculpture in Natural Bridge, Virginia.
Photo by Ben Schumin on July 1, 2006.

Foamhenge.jpg

By Me (Self-photographed) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The story of Foamhenge in Natural Bridge, Virginia
The story of Foamhenge in Natural Bridge, Virginia
8 April 2007

Honorable Mentions

Two other noteworthy Stonehenge replicas are Fridgehenge and Phonehenge. Fridgehenge was a Stonehenge replica made out of refrigerators that was located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I refer to it in the past tense because it no longer exists. Phonehenge is a Stonehenge replica made out of those old-fashioned red British phone booths. It is part of a rock-and-roll amusement park called Freestyle Music Park near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

I could not find public domain or Creative Commons images of these replicas, so here are some links to articles that provide both pictures and more information about them:

“Stonefridge, a Fridgehenge, New Mexico” – Clonehenge

“Santa Fe, New Mexico: Stonefridge (Gone)” – RoadsideAmerica.com

“Phonehenge – Remarkable Replica Of Stonehenge” – Planet Oddity

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2 thoughts on “Replicas of Famous Landmarks

    1. I appreciate your comment. 🙂 Yes, it was fun to write this post. I enjoyed looking at these replicas and finding out the stories behind them. I plan to explore more unusual topics in future posts.

      Once again, thanks for dropping by my blog to leave a comment. It was good to hear from you again. 🙂

      Like

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