Happy April Fool’s Day

An April fool in Denmark, regarding Copenhagen's new subway. It looks as if one of its cars had an accident, and had broken through and surfaced on the square in front of the town hall. In reality, it was a retired subway car from the subway of Stockholm cut obliquely, with the front end placed onto the tiling and loose tiles scattered around it. Note the sign "Gevalia" and the accident site tape with the words "Uventede gæster?" (unexpected guests?). Gevalia coffee's advertising featured various vehicles popping up with unexpected guests.
Aprilsnar 2001.png
By Lars Andersen
Public Domain Image
2001-04-01
An April fool in Denmark, regarding Copenhagen’s new subway. It looks as if one of its cars had an accident, and had broken through and surfaced on the square in front of the town hall. In reality, it was a retired subway car from the subway of Stockholm cut obliquely, with the front end placed onto the tiling and loose tiles scattered around it. Note the sign “Gevalia” and the accident site tape with the words “Uventede gæster?” (unexpected guests?). Gevalia coffee’s advertising featured various vehicles popping up with unexpected guests.

 

April Fool's magazine with the caption: "Ball houses, new practical and healthy construction - The first ball home street in Dresden, opened to traffic on April 1..
Kugelhäuser.jpg
Unknown author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Deutsch: Aprilscherz der Zeitschrift mit der Bildunterschrift: “Kugelhäuser, die neue praktische und gesunde Bauweise. – Die erste Kugelhausstrasse in Dresden, am 1. April dem Verkehr übergeben.
English Translation: April Fool’s magazine with the caption: “Ball houses, new practical and healthy construction – The first ball home street in Dresden, opened to traffic on April 1..
1929
Source: Bilderwoche 1929

Washing The Lions

This prank is best known as an April Fool’s Day joke. In fact, a report of it being perpetrated in 1698 is the earliest recorded example of an April Fool’s Day prank. The April 2, 1698 edition of Dawks’s News-Letter reported that “Yesterday being the first of April, several persons were sent to the Tower Ditch to see the Lions washed” (Notes and Queries, 1913, 357). . . .

The washing-the-lions prank falls into the broad category of “sleeveless errand” pranks—more commonly referred to today as “wild-goose chases.” A sleeveless errand involves sending a victim on a fruitless quest in search of an item, or event, that does not exist.

Source: “Washing The Lions” – Hoaxipedia

A ticket to "Washing the Lions" in London from 1857. This traditional April Fools prank is first recorded in 1698
Washing of the Lions.jpg
Unknown author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
A ticket to “Washing the Lions” in London from 1857. This traditional April Fools prank is first recorded in 1698.
Source: http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/Hoaxipedia/Washing_The_Lions/

Saint Stupid’s Day Parade

The Saint Stupid’s Day Parade is an annual parade in San Francisco on April 1. It was founded by Ed Holmes in the late 1970s. If April 1 falls on a weekday, the parade starts at the foot of Market Street and follows a route through the financial district. If April 1 falls on a weekend, the parade starts at the Transamerica Pyramid, proceeds up Columbus Street and ends at Washington Square. The parade begins at noon.

Source: “Saint Stupid’s Day Parade” – Wikipedia

Saint Stupid's Day Parade in San Francisco.
Marching.jpg
By Hellers1155 (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Saint Stupid’s Day Parade in San Francisco. The Saint Stupid’s Day Parade is an annual San Francisco guerrilla celebration of all things stupid. It is a reminder that no matter how seriously we take ourselves, we are still basically smart monkeys.
4/1/2009
SaintStupid.jpg 48states at en.wikipedia [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0], from Wikimedia Commons 1 April 2001
SaintStupid.jpg
48states at en.wikipedia [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0], from Wikimedia Commons
1 April 2001

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Happy April Fool’s Day

  1. A fun post Arlene. I just love the Ball Houses. Maybe they have Ball kitchens with Ball toasters and Ball washing machines.
    When I was about 7 years old my parents made a black cat tail shaped ball of wool laying about a foot away from our curled up black cat and said the tail had fallen off. I cried !
    This 1950’s video I remember. Many believed it. I still do 😉 ❤
    .

    .

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Ralph. I like the Ball Houses too! 🙂 They have a fantastic futuristic feel to them even though they are not “real” houses.

      The fake cat tail prank made me say, “Oh no!” I know you care a lot about cats, so that must have been an awful sight for you. I like cats (and dogs too), so I am also glad that the cat was actually okay.

      I enjoyed seeing that video! 🙂 Many years ago I remember seeing a pasta commercial similar to this video here in the United States. The video and commercial made me laugh too, but I hope people know better by now . . .

      Thanks again for the likes and for giving me some wonderful feedback about this post. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Those houses are really lovely compared to a lot of “boxes” built today. I would love to see them beside the road ways. Curves are more natural. 😀
        It was an “oh no” cat moment for me. Poor thing. The cat was fine sleeping through all the fuss.
        My favourite pranks used to be on the UK Candid Camera. Don’t see it any more !
        No ! Thank YOU for posting Arlene 😀

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes, I agree. The Victorian houses and some of the other older houses here in Sacramento are more visually appealing to me than the newer ones. So many residential homes I see around here are “boxes” with cookie-cutter layouts.

          I am glad that you survived this shocking prank. I hope you were able to recover quickly. At least your cat was not affected or harmed by it.

          There was a US version of Candid Camera a long time ago. I don’t watch much television anymore, so I don’t know if any attempts to revive the program have been made over the years.

          You are welcome, Ralph. I am glad that you are enjoying my posts. It is good to hear from you again. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

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