Mushroom Buildings

The inspiration for this post came from a story I read about a mushroom house in Bethesda, Maryland, that recently sold for $920,000. After reading this story, I became curious to see if other mushroom-shaped houses exist. They do!

Mushroom Houses

Mushroom House, Cincinnati

"Mushroom House" in Hyde Park Cincinnati
Mushroom House.jpg
By DaveMenninger (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
“Mushroom House” in Hyde Park Cincinnati

Here is some background information about this house from curbed.com:

Part Tim Burton, part Pixar, and every bit bonkers, Cincinnati’s well-known, much-loved Mushroom House was designed by the late architect Terry Brown with help from 35 of his former students from the University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning. The team built the one-bedroom, one-bathroom, 1,260-square-foot residence using the sort of quirky materials Brown grew famous for: metal, wood, glass, shell, and ceramics. . . .

Source: “Inside Cincy’s Magical and Tripped-Out “Mushroom House” by Sarah Firshein – curbed.com (also contains additional photos)

 

Mushroom House, New York

Mushroom House detail
Pod house detail, Perinton, New York.JPG
By DanielPenfield (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
Mushroom House detail
6 October 2010

Atlas Obscura describes this house as follows:

The structure was designed by architect James H. Johnson for Robert and Marguerite Antell. Ground was broken in 1970 and after several failed attempts the original structures were completed in 1972. The 4½ pods are constructed of concrete and polyurethane and stand on fourteen 20-foot stems of steel-reinforced concrete. Mrs. Antell, a potter, was very much involved with the construction and among other things personally hand crafted and fired over 9,000 ceramic tiles which are found throughout.

Source: “Mushroom House of Rochester” – Atlas Obscura website

This mushroom house is for sale, and it even has its own website.

Mushroom House, Korea

Mushroom shaped house on the edge of Goheung, Jeollanam-do.
Korea-Goheung-Mushroom shaped house 4329.JPG
By Steve46814 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
Mushroom shaped house on the edge of Goheung, Jeollanam-do.
8 June 2006

I could not find any background information about this particular mushroom house.

Mushroom Kiosks

Besides mushroom houses, I also discovered some mushroom-shaped kiosks. I noticed the words imbisse and imbiss on them and had no idea what these words meant. I looked them up and found out that they are German words for snack bars. According to an article I read in the New York Times called “Street Food With Ambition in Berlin” by Gisela Williams, imbisse is “a word that encompasses everything from sidewalk stalls that sell currywurst (sliced sausage smothered with curry powder and ketchup) to holes in the wall that serve Turkish döner kebabs (thick pita sandwiches stuffed with shaved meat, salad and yogurt sauce).” Williams further notes that imbiss is the singular form of imbisse.

 

A mushroom kiosk is a typical for the 1950s kiosk building in the form of a fly agaric, which was originally developed for the promotion of milk and dairy products as "milk mushroom". This stands in Bregenz, Close To Port
Pilzkiosk Bregenz.JPG
By böhringer friedrich (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons
Ein Pilzkiosk ist ein für die 1950er Jahre typisches Kioskgebäude in Form eines Fliegenpilzes, das ursprünglich für die Verkaufsförderung von Milch und Milchprodukten als „Milchpilz“ entwickelt wurde. Dieser steht in Bregenz, Nähe Hafen
English Translation: A mushroom kiosk is a typical for the 1950s kiosk building in the form of a fly agaric, which was originally developed for the promotion of milk and dairy products as “milk mushroom”. This stands in Bregenz, Close To Port
2 August 2008

 

“milk mushroom” in Borgholzhausen-Bahnhof, County of Gütersloh, Germany
Borgholzhausen Bahnhof Milchpilz.jpg
By Hagar66 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
“milk mushroom” in Borgholzhausen-Bahnhof, County of Gütersloh, Germany
11.07.2008

I hope you enjoyed this virtual tour of some mushroom-shaped buildings from around the world. 🙂

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Mushroom Buildings

    1. Yes, these were fun houses to look at, Ralph. 🙂 I guess the square boxes outnumber the creatively made homes because they are easier and cheaper to make. In addition, people have to be careful that any house they build or anything that they add on to an existing house does not violate any safety laws.

      Thanks again for your feedback and for taking the time to like this post and “One.” I hope you enjoy the rest of your week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. 🙂 I am glad that you enjoyed this post. It has been awhile since I put together a fun post like this one, so I enjoyed it too. 🙂 I appreciate your enthusiastic response, and thanks for liking this post as well as “One” and “Princess in Peacock Feather Mask.” I hope you enjoy the rest of your week. 🙂

      Like

    1. Thank you for interesting comments and for liking this post! 🙂 It fascinates me how people from different parts of the world were able to come up with similar creative concepts, especially in the days when worldwide travel was not commonplace and the Internet did not exist.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s